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Dog Aggression Towards Children

Posted By amr23 6 Years Ago
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amr23
Posted 6 Years Ago
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My dog, Gringa, a 1 1/2 yrs mixed breed I adopted as a puppy, is very well behaved on a leash, and is quite obedient with me and her (human) daddy without a leash. She had several months of obedience training and is very active. However, she has an unexplained aggression towards children. She has, on multiple occassions, growled and barked at children. She has not been around them, as I do not have children of my own. I am not one who believes in keeping a dog in a muzzle nor on a leash at all times, but I´m afraid that, without the ability to subject children to a training regiment with her, that I will have no choice. Suggestions VERY MUCH appreciated.

dobermom
Posted 6 Years Ago
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I am sorry, but a child should not go thru a training regiment, the dog obviously has Issues with children, should be kept under check at all times around then, if you do not want the dog to become a liability.



Believe me, as a mother of 4, a child has priority over a dogs desire being leash free.

Our schnauzer has very low tolerance when it comes to children, the Doberman on the other hand , no problems, loves them.

WE as a precaution put Tenacious D in another room.

I do not want him to nip or growl or bite another child,he never has, but, I know kids, there unpredictable, and dogs who are unfamiliar with children, can react acordingly aggressive.





IF I were you, I would go places where the dog can see the children, hear them, so he gets to know them, there behavior, but never ever off leash.

You will loose a lot more then your dog if he decides to bite.






Our Dogs are not spoiled,we're just well trained Wink


Turbo K9
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Regardless of the root of her behavior, it is dangerous, and a severe liability.  My only suggestion is, to keep her on a leash.  Whether you like to do so or not, isn't at issue, but the fact that you are risking a serious incident, is. 

As far as correcting the problem, some trainers have their own children who are more knowledgable of, and better able to read, dogs than most adults.  I would suggest looking for a professional trainer who you can work with.  I've done such with my older son, with great success... at six years he's a better dog handler than many people I've competed against. 

The kid has to know, and understand, dogs.  There has to be a healthy dose of respect, yet a complete lack of fear.  That is rare in a child. He has to know what to expect, has to be able to look at the dog and know exactly what is going on in the dogs head.  Anything else and you risk hurting a child.  It is not something you should do on your own.

Terry B

America is a large friendly dog in a very small room.  Every time it wags its tail, it knocks over a chair. - Arnold Toynbee (1889-1975)

 



sandy
Posted 6 Years Ago
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dOBERMOM AND tURBO PRETTY MUCH TOLD YOU...... COULD NOT HAVE SAID IT BETTER MYSELF..... LIABILITY... LIABILITY... LIABILITY AND IS A CHILD'S LIFE WORTH IT....

 

 Casey -Chocolate lab -  3 years old Dec 23rd  2008     Corky - Lab-Dobie mix - 4 on Feb 12th 2009

canecorso_breeder
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Dobermom and Turbo pretty much had my mind read! If a dog lives with children, or around children, and CANNOT act appropreatley towards children, it is well suggested to give him to a reputable owner with no kids, or even the "e" word...I owned a Cane Corso in 2002 who apparently was bad tempered. he attacted my young brother and myself (I was young as well) who FED this dog. Well, anyways, he was gone in two seconds, and a dog who holds grudges against other humans, even children who stand as gaurdians, must lead a stressful life. If the dog is any way good to children, suggest heavy obiedience and let children give him treats under you supervision on leash and tell his to make friends after you shake their hand and let him know its ok. Good luck my friend, and Happy Training!!

Regards,

    Cane Corso

The Cane Corso enthusiest!

 

Myblacklab
Posted 5 Years Ago
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Try this, Have your dog beside you "on a leash" and get a child that is old enough to understand. Have the child walk by at a safe distance throwing treats to him. And do that for a while. Soon the dog will want the child to come, but it takes time. If your dog is too focus barking at the child, you give it the treats but once the child is out of view stop. Keep doing this. Hope is helps and tell me how it goes.

Dogs don't hold gruges, they forgive and move on. We can learn a few things from dog.


Turbo K9
Posted 5 Years Ago
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Ohhhh boy, this is where people learn to hate me, LOL.



Two things will happen... either the dog will relate the child with good treats, and happiness and butterflies and all is well, or the dog will relate the child with good treats and when your guard is down he'll suddenly lunge at a passing child trying to scare the treats out of them, so to speak.



Food reward and treat programs can work, but they can also backfire horribly, depending on the dog.




Terry B

America is a large friendly dog in a very small room.  Every time it wags its tail, it knocks over a chair. - Arnold Toynbee (1889-1975)

 



staffordmom
Posted 5 Years Ago
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I have a Bullmastiff that is afraid of children, not aggressive, just wants to run away from them. I keep her on leash and away from children. She has not been raised with children or been around them much. I suppose with a lot of training, you could improve things, but I personaly wouldn't risk it.

staffordmom

ZerosMom
Crazy Posted 5 Years Ago
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My german shepard, Zero, will be one year old in Feb., she was raised with my little brothers( 5 and 7) as a puppy she adored them, would wait for the to come home from school, play and cuddle with them, the past 3 months though, she's become "weird" around them, especially the 7 year old. She growls at him, without showing teeth or barking, just a low growl and hides her head when he gets close. i've tried everything I know to get her out of this but I'm afraid she might bite him someday and i've come to terms with possibly getting rid of her. I love her a lot but she's not worth my baby brothers being hurt for anything. I'm considering a shock collar and will be buying a muzzle today. She wasn't socialized  with other dogs her size(i don't live in a "nice" area) but I will be doing that as well with a new friends dogs. Does anyone have some advice on this? She's well trained and learns very easily in every other aspect. She's overly protective with me when strangers are around, but she's submissive to me and never challenges me. Also I tried filling a bottle with rocks, the "no bottle" but it just scares the hell out of her and I don't think that's enforcing good behaviour. Thanks!!!

-Anna

Myblacklab
Posted 5 Years Ago
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when she growls take her imedently out of the room, and wait for he to calm down

Dogs don't hold gruges, they forgive and move on. We can learn a few things from dog.




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